What to Expect at a Greenville Family Court Hearing

greenville family court

Be prepared for your hearing at the Greenville Family Court facility

We’ve had more than one client express hesitation or anxiety as their family law court date approaches. It can be a daunting experience: entering a quiet courtroom with a no-nonsense judge who will make a judgement that will have a permanent outcome on your life.

At Sarah Henry Law, we want to take some of the intimidation out of your experience by giving you a general expectation of what will happen on your court date. You can be confident that our office will have filed all the proper paperwork and that are prepared you for your hearing.

The Greenville County Clerk of Court’s office works with your attorney and the other parties to schedule your hearings in family court. All court appearances are held between 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. Family court hearings are held before one of eight resident Family Court Judges. Usually a particular judge will be assigned to preside over your hearing well in advance, although this is subject to change.

The Greenville County Family Court is currently located at 350 Halton Road in Greenville. Please be aware, if you have been to the Greenville Family Court prior to November 2021, that this is a new location. The Greenville County Court requires entrants to be “properly dressed” and we suggest professional or business attire for any court appearances.  Please arrive 15 minutes early for your hearing to allow time to find a parking space, pass through the security checkpoint located at the front entrance, and meet with your attorney prior to the case being called.

You’ll meet with your attorney at the courthouse and enter the courtroom together once the bailiff calls your case. Once inside the courtroom your attorney will take the lead when interacting with the court and other parties. Some hearings are “testimonial” hearings and require you and other witnesses to testify. Other hearings, like temporary hearings, merely allow affidavits, exhibits and packets to be submitted for the court to review during the hearing.

You attorney will discuss these different hearing types with you and indicate whether your testimony will be necessary for that hearing. If you are required to speak to the court we suggested addressing the presiding judge as “Your Honor.”

Frequently Asked Questions

Will there be a jury?
No. Cases heard by the Greenville County Family Court are presided over by a judge. The judge assigned to your case will make a final decision on the outcome of your case.

Can I represent myself?
Yes, but it isn’t recommended by legal practitioners or even by the court itself. Divorce, property disputes between spouses, alimony decisions, custody agreements and other family court matters are often complicated cases, and those without specific knowledge and experience with the family court rules, statutes, and caselaw are at a distinct disadvantage when navigating the family court system.

Can I appeal my case?
Appeals filed for Family Court cases are heard by the South Carolina Court of Appeals. It’s important to talk with your attorney about the appeals process as it relates to your individual case.

Client Reviews

Sarah K.
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"Sarah was very aggressive and efficient in fighting for us in court and out of court. Sarah knows her stuff and is very sympathetic to the process of child custody cases. I would recommend."
Marla L.
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"I appreciated that in her compassion, she did not waste my time, always considerate of the financial impact of the process. Katie was efficient, responsive, and very helpful. I highly recommend Sarah Henry as an attorney for family issues."
Cassandra Z.
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"I cannot say enough good things about Sarah and her team (especially Katie!). She provided phenomenal advice through my divorce proceedings and was very supportive. Very professional and efficient."

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